The Shakespeare Bastard

The Shakespeare Bastard

Richard Burbage There is a case for saying that William Shakspere was chased out of London in 1599/1600 by the ridicule of Oxford and Jonson and by loss of support from his former patrons Essex and Southampton, for whom he was useful because of the similarity of his name with that of the playwright. This […]....
Our Enduring Authorship Mystery Still Awaiting Academic Breakthrough

Our Enduring Authorship Myster...

Let us look forward to the day when some plucky Stratfordian mainstreamer breaks from the citadel, stiffens the sinews, and signals to his colleagues that the time has come at last to do some proper work, to lay aside his prejudice, to examine the facts, and in calm and contemplative fashion to begin to justify [&helli....
Who was “Our English Terence Will: Shake-speare”? Could it have been William Stanley, 6th Earl of Derby?

Who was “Our English Terence...

This presentation will not propose that William Stanley, 6th Earl of Derby was the sole or even main author of the works of Shakespeare but will attempt to explain why a number of highly intelligent people thought he was: James Greenstreet (1891), Robert Frazer (1915), Abel Lefranc (1918), RM Lucas (1937), AW Titherley....
John Casson, the source for Hamlet, and The Guardian

John Casson, the source for H...

Francois de Belleforest  On March 5th 2018, The Guardian printed an article about an interview with Dr John Casson, someone many DVS members will have heard speak at the SAT November meetings. He’d examined a 1576 copy of François de Belleforest’s Les Histoires Tragiques, held by the British Library, which has....
Another of Hamlet’s Books? Petrarch’s De Remediis Utriusque Fortunae, by Thomas Twyne

Another of Hamlet’s Book...

In Act II, Scene ii of Hamlet the Prince enters reading a book. When Polonius asks Hamlet, “What do you read, my Lord?” Hamlet answers, accurately, but with petulant sarcasm, “Words, words, words.” In the exchange between the two which follows over the “matter,” Hamlet refers directly to the author of the....
Was Queen Elizabeth’s 1571 Gift to Oxford Given to the Earl of Southampton?

Was Queen Elizabeth’s 1571 G...

At 21 years of age Edward de Vere was victorious in the Accession Day Tilts on 17 November 1571. Instituted as an annual celebration of the date on which Elizabeth came to the throne, the Accession Day tilts or tournaments consisted of the medieval-style jousting of knights in armour, the “knights” being her courti....